ODS destruction/recovery technologies


Europe: focus on the consumption, exports, production and destruction of ozone depleting substances

The European Environment Agency (EAA) published in September 2017 a report entitled Ozone-depleting substances 2016. The report summarises the data reported by European companies in accordance with the Ozone depleting substances (ODS) Regulation for 2016 and looks at the major trends since 2006. The substances concerned are those of controlled by the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer — chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride (CTC), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), hydrobromofluorocarbons (HBFCs), bromochloromethane (BCM) and methyl bromide (MB).

A-Gas cranes in new separator

A-Gas is on schedule to double its refrigerant reclamation capacity at its Portbury, Bristol, site with the completion of the major structural components of a new refrigerant separator.

Pakistan and UN Environment Organize the “Ozone2Climate” Technology Roadshow and Industry Roundtable

The first ever “Ozone2Climate” Technology Roadshow and Industry Roundtable under the HCFC Phase out Management Plan project was organized by the Ministry of Climate Change, Government of Pakistan, UN Environment Compliance Assistance Programme (CAP) Asia and Pacific Office AP team in association with UNIDO and the Pakistan Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Industry Association. The Technology Roadshow and one-day Roundtable was organized as a part of the launch of the recently approved Stage 2 project for HCFC phase out and helped the participants understand the implications of the recently agreed Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol for the phase down of HFCs.

EPA slashes supply R-22 to 13 million pounds this year

The supply of R-22 is dwindling. Back in October 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its final phasedown schedule regarding the production and importation of HCFC-22. The order called for an immediate drop from 51 million pounds allowed in 2014 to 22 million pounds in 2015 and 18 million pounds in 2016. The supply will be further slashed to 13 million pounds this year, 9 million pounds in 2018, and 4 million pounds in 2019. No new or imported R-22 will be allowed in the U.S. on or after Jan. 1, 2020.